St. Alban’s is a Grade II listed Church and sits prominently on the hill at Earsdon. It is very early Victorian being built in 1836-7. It is the church of the Hartley Pit Disaster of 1862 where most of the funerals were held for the 204 men and boys who were killed in the mining tragedy. There is a Grade II listed memorial to the disaster in the church yard. There are also two stained glass windows in the church which commemorate those who died.

St. Alban’s is by far the largest building in the village of Earsdon and is the most notable landmark in a village which has enjoyed conservation area status since 1975. St. Alban’s undoubtedly contributes to the character of the village and character of the village compliments St. Alban’s. St. Alban’s graveyard is one of the largest in the diocese with more than six thousand plots. Records show burials took place here in
in the late sixteenth century.

The graveyard has been extended in the past, most notably in 1862 following the pit disaster at New Hartley. The Duke of Northumberland gave a plot of land to the north of the church for the burial of the victims and this was later incorporated into the churchyard.

It is very early Victorian being built in 1836- where most of the funerals were held for the 204 men and boys who were killed in the mining tragedy. There listed memorial to the disaster in the church yard. There are also two stained glass windows in the church which commemorate those who died.

St. Alban’s is by far the largest building in the village of Earsdon and is the most notable landmark in a village which has enjoyed conservation area status since 1975. St. Alban’s undoubtedly contributes to the character of the village and character of the village compliments St. Alban’s. St. Alban’s graveyard is one of the largest in the diocese with more than six thousand plots. Records show burials took place here in the late sixteenth century. The graveyard has been extended in the past, most notably in 1862 following the pit disaster at New Hartley. The Duke of Northumberland gave a plot of land to the north of the church for the burial of the victims and this was later incorporated into the churchyard.

LessSt. Alban’s is a Grade II listed Church and sits prominently on the hill at Earsdon. It is very early Victorian being built in 1836-7. It is the church of the Hartley Pit Disaster of 1862 where most of the funerals were held for the 204 men and boys who were killed in the mining tragedy. There is a Grade II listed memorial to the disaster in the church yard. There are also two stained glass windows in the church which commemorate those who died.

St. Alban’s is by far the largest building in the village of Earsdon and is the most notable landmark in a village which has enjoyed conservation area status since 1975. St. Alban’s undoubtedly contributes to the character of the village and character of the village compliments St. Alban’s. St. Alban’s graveyard is one of the largest in the diocese with more than six thousand plots.

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